A Psychiatrist’s View of ‘Bachelor’ Bad Girl Courtney

Courtney Robertson

Dr. Carole Lieberman

Dr. Carole Lieberman, M.D., the psychiatrist who literally wrote the book about Bad Girls (Bad Girls: Why Men Love Them & How Good Girls Can Learn Their Secrets), offers up a bouquet of insights about “The Bachelor’s” reviled Courtney Robertson, who got a hold of current title single guy Ben Flajnik to the dismay of other bachelorettes including Good Girl Lindsay (aka Lindzi Cox).  Dr. Lieberman has defined a dozen categories of Bad Girls, but they apparently share the characteristic of having been hurt, hardened their hearts, given up on love and then begun using men for various purposes.  “They’re not embarrassed or vulnerable themselves, which is why Courtney was so easily able to manipulate him.  She was so demonstrative, so sexual, she acted as if she was madly in love with him.  She could be more brave, audacious and bold about making a play for him because it really didn’t mean as much to her as Lindsay.  She really wasn’t in love with him, she just wanted to win the show.  Bad girls use sexuality to trap the men, like Courtney suggesting they go skinny dipping, which was very seductive.”

Ben, meanwhile, fit into the category of Sitting Ducks, says the shrink.

As much fun as it is to diss Courtney, there is a sobering side effect when it comes to impressionable young viewers’ finding role models in Bad Girls.  “Whatever dysfunction is in the home, the media worsens the situations by glamorizing them.  Look at the Kardashians.  They’re all Bad Girls.  They make it look like being bad is cool.”  Not to mention profitable.