Tag Archives: Andy Garcia

Art of Film is Ageless At Swanky, Star-Studded AARP Movies for Grownups Awards

Lori Loughlin

LORI LOUGHLIN LEAVING ‘90210’ ON ‘BEST OF TERMS’

Lori Loughlin says she has no regrets about departing “90210” and is leaving the CW show “on the very best of terms.”  Lori, who’s been playing mom to Shenae Grimes and Tristan Wilds on the series since 2008, departs at season’s end as the show’s young cast of characters graduates from high school and heads off into college life.

“The CW has a demographic and they need to write to that demographic and I think the CW does that really well, you know?” she says.

“I think, for me, it’s time to creatively move on, because there’s not that much for me to do, and again, I understand and I have no hard feelings.”

Not that Loughlin’s character has lacked for drama through the years, with her own hot romances and a rivalry with Jennie Garth that heated up in Season 2.  Garth told us recently that she disliked the direction “90210” has been taking.  Loughlin says, “You know, I think it’s fine.  Jennie had a different attachment to the show.  ‘Beverly Hills, 90210’ was her show for so many years, and she felt protective, almost motherly toward it.  Along comes the new incarnation, and I don’t think she was happy with what they were doing.  But for me, I had no attachment to the old version, so I was completely fine with it.  I also thought it was a whole different show.  Also, I think she had some issues with what they wanted to do with her character, and I understand that, because nobody knows that character better than Jennie.  So at times I think she felt like they were misrepresenting Kelly.”

As for what Loughlin will do next, the mother of 11 and 12-year-old daughters, and wife of designer Mossimo Giannulli says, “I’m going to take a moment and breathe before I jump back into anything.  I love television, but a series is a grind and so I just want to take a moment before I make any decisions.”

Robert Redford

MEANWHILE:  We caught up with Loughlin at this week’s 10th Annual Movies for Grownups Awards, the elegant event honoring the best of 2010 films appealing to mature moviegoers, put on by AARP at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel.  Sally Field, Tony Bennett, Angela Lansbury, Larry Hagman, Jacqueline Bisset, Mickey Rooney and dozens of other names were there to celebrate honorees including Lifetime Achievement Award winner Robert Redford.  Winners on hand included “The King’s Speech” Best Actor Colin Firth; Best Actress Lesley Manville (“Another Year”); Best Supporting Actress Phylicia Rashad (“For Colored Girls”); Andy Garcia, picking up Best Comedy Film honors for his “City Island”; and Rob Reiner, receiving his theater seat statuette for the Best Intergenerational Film, his charming “Flipped.”  Rob congratulated the AARP for making their award look less like an electric chair than it used to.

AGELESS:  “The King’s Speech” screenwriter David Seidler admitted to the crowd that initially, it was assumed that the film “would be seen by nobody under 40.  It was basically made for this audience.  I didn’t quite buy into that, and I was delighted when we realized that a youthful audience was able to see and enjoy this film.  They understood the teasing.  They understood the bullying.  They understood being marginalized.  They understood bravery. And they understood the power of a supportive friendship.  What that means to me is that film is universal and it doesn’t make any difference what age you are” — a view supported by the fact the film has now surpassed the $150 million mark in box office grosses.

He added, “If you still have a brain you can still be a pain and make a contribution to the art and commerce of film…I would like to think we can view this and see ‘Toy Story 3’ and love it, and the audience that ‘Toy Story 3’ was made for can see this film and love it.”

Jane Seymour ABC photo

SAY WHAT?:  Jane Seymour, ravishing in a form-hugging red cocktail dress, made it clear she is squarely in “The King’s Speech” camp, telling us “I loved it in every possible way.  Since I played Wallis Simpson years ago, I sort of had an inside feeling for that particular movie.  I know what went on.”

Jane’s own latest effort, the current “Waiting for Forever” — she’s a producer on the film directed by husband James Keach, not a star — has met with mixed response.  “People are seeing it and loving it.  Some of the critics don’t get it.  One of them talked about it being about stalkers, and said it’s irresponsible to make a movie like that with what happened in Arizona.  I thought, ‘What in the world has that got to do with this movie?'” admitted Jane.  That is a strange take on the off-beat comedy in which Tom Sturridge plays a street performing juggler who wants to court the love of his life, “The O.C.’s” Rachel Bilson.  Jane’s feeling about that critic:  “Clearly, he saw another movie.  It’s wild.  But anyway, I’m very proud of it.”

Martin Landau

AND:  Martin Landau also told us he’s a fan of “The King’s Speech” and is impressed by “The Town” as well.  “Ben Affleck is a really good director,” noted Landau, the 82-year-old Oscar winner who still heads The Actors Studio’s West Coast branch — and keeps up a schedule demanding enough to daunt folks half his age.  Currently, “I’m doing Tim Burton’s new ‘Frankenweenie,’ his new animated feature.  And I’m doing ‘The Simpsons,'” added Landau, whose tender “Lovely, Still” love story with Ellen Burstyn is newly out on DVD this month. “Then there’s a script I’m reading now, a two-character road picture.  I like it, so I may do it.  A bunch of stuff is going on.  That’s better than not, right?”  Right.

‘White Collar’s’ Tiffani Thiessen: Baby-Centric and Loving It

Matt Bomer, Tiffani Thiessen USA Network photo

While the "White Collar" team is busy creating episodes of their sophisticated crime dramedy, off-camera their set is becoming something of a romper room. At least, that's the feeling one gets listening to Tiffani Thiessen, whose six-month-old daughter, Harper, is the latest addition to the tiny visitor contingent.

"There are a lot of people on our show who have kids. She's definitely the newest one. I think they love having her energy around the set. It's fun. I think we're going to have a little playroom/nursery when we go back into production," says the actress, who plays the smart wife of an FBI man (Tim DeKay) on the popular series that also stars Matt Bomer as a reformed, debonair thief. They'll resume work in March for the show's third season. "White Collar" returns to the USA Network schedule with part two of Season 2 on Jan. 18.

It wasn't easy going back to work six-and-a-half weeks after giving birth, Thiessen admits. "I missed everyone, but I was not real excited about going back. It was definitely challenging. You're kind of like a walking zombie, tired all the time. I'm nursing, so my mom would come to the set and take care of her while I was working. The show has been amazing. They gave me time whenever I had to nurse her. I'm really blessed to have had so much understanding and a lot of great help. I have to give credit where it's due -- I couldn't have done it without help from my mom and my husband (actor Brady Smith)."

Right now, Thiessen's attention is on Harper's first Christmas and "all the things you've got to do -- the cheesy photos with Santa, the Christmas tree," she notes happily. The Smiths will spend "half our Christmas in California with my family, and half in Texas with his," she adds.

There's also Thiessen's new entrepreneurial sideline: Petit Nest, the baby furnishings line, including, she says, "cribs, dressers, chairs, gliders, decorative art and things like bedding and linens."

"When I was designing my own nursery ... I realized there was not a lot out there that appealed to (my) tastes," she says.

All of which might lead one to think the one-time "Saved by the Bell" and "Beverly Hills, 90210" cutie has a baby-centric mindset these days. And that's just fine with her. "She's the light of my life," she says of Harper. "I fall in love with her more every day."

FAMILY TRADITIONS: Speaking of families and holidays, Andy Garcia reports it will be a big family gathering this Christmas for him and his kin. "We take our holidays very seriously. We have 30 people over for Thanksgiving every year, and celebrate Christmas with our extended family members. We have four kids," reminds the actor, whose grown daughters, Dominik and Daniella, have already followed him into the acting realm.

Indeed, acting is quite the family affair in the Garcia clan. Speaking of 19-year-old college student Alessandra and 8-year-old son Andres, he notes, "In school, they always take story theater and that kind of thing. They're exposed to the theater. I think that being comfortable performing in front of people is very good for their self-esteem. My oldest daughters did that from a very early age. Now they're obviously colleagues. We've done two movies together," he says, referring to his "City Island" and "The Lost City."

He adds, "As a proud father, it's always good to look across the dining room table and see your child there is happy and being fulfilled."

PILOT TIME: Interesting that "SHREDD," the proposed series about real-life skateboarders, is being preceded by a pilot that is a mere 11 minutes long. Next thing you know, we'll be seeing two-minute pilots or even 30-second pilots. It's the economy, of course, and heck, wouldn't want anyone to work too hard.

They're rounding out the cast of another pilot, for "Dead Time Stories," an anthology of tales referred to as "cool, creepy and fun" -- but not too horrible for the tween set and older.

Andy Garcia: Whatever the Economy, Dreams Need to Be Pursued

Dominik Garcia-Lorido, Julianna Margulies, Steven Strait, Andy Garcia and Ezra Miller

Andy Garcia had hoped to get his “Hemingway & Fuentes” film starring himself, Anthony Hopkins and Annette Bening, before the cameras this year.  But as of now, he’s still working on getting the financing together for the indie feature he wrote himself and intends to direct, about the possible real-life inspiration for “The Old Man and the Sea.”  Like countless other filmmakers, Garcia’s feeling the effects of the recession.  

 “It is more difficult now to find funding, yes, but that shouldn’t deter the effort,” he says firmly.  “Even though the money situation could be a little tighter than usual, a quality project will eventually attract it.  We can’t be complacent or intimidated by a market condition.  We’re dealing with dreams, and dreams need to be pursued. 

“It took me 16 years to get ‘The Lost City’ made,” he reminds, speaking of his 2005 drama set amid the turmoil of late 1950’s Havana.  “And through all that time, I never lost the dream. 

 “‘City Island’ took three years,” he adds, referring to his acclaimed dramedy of this year.  Garcia plays the corrections officer patriarch of a Bronx family in which every member is keeping secrets — that all begin to unravel.  Julianna Margulies, Alan Arkin, Emily Mortimer and Garcia’s real-life eldest daughter, Dominik, also star.  Garcia is being talked as a dark horse Academy Awards candidate for the feature, written and directed by Raymond De Felitta on which Garcia also served as producer.

According to him, the moviemakers got all their first choices for the cast.  He notes that DeFelitta “wrote a beautiful script, and you always know great actors will be attracted to great material.”

 Garcia has made a habit of going back and forth between big studio movies and small labor-of-love independents.  He says that patter has grown out of creative desires rather than career design.  “You have stories you want to tell, movies that might come your way, that are not bein offered by the studios.  You can’t really control what the studios are going to want you do to, so I don’t really concern myself with them.  I create my own opportunities with stories that move me.”