Tag Archives: Anne Hathaway

JENNIFER LAWRENCE HIGHLIGHTS AN OSCAR NIGHT FULL OF UPS AND DOWNS

85th Academy Awards, TelecastJennifer Lawrence is a live wire.  The “Silver Linings Playbook” Oscar winner livened things up back in the press room Sunday night after winning her award as Best Actress.   As those who watched the 85th Academy Awards show know, Lawrence tripped and fell on her way up the steps to retrieve her statuette.  A reporter with a thick accent asked her what happened and if she meant to do that.

“Was it on purpose?  Absolutely,” scoffed the 22-year-old, stunning in a strapless ice pink Dior gown that featured a lavish, patterned skirt.  “What do you mean, what happened?  Look at my dress.  I stepped on the fabric, they just waxed the floor.”

Then she was asked, “What was going through your mind?”

“A bad word I can’t say,” responded feisty Lawrence, to laughter, “that starts with F.”

A reporter asked her feelings on becoming so successful at such a young age, and whether it’s a good thing to get honored so early in her career.  “I guess so, yeah.  Who knows?  I guess we’ll see.” Then the reporter persisted:  was she fearful of peaking too soon?

“Well, now I am,” she answered.

Looking over the crowd of media from around the world seated at tables before her, holding aloft their numbers in hopes of being called upon to ask their question, Lawrence noted, “It’s like an auction, right?… I feel like I’m picking people to make fun of me.”

In the middle of describing her day, as chaotic and nerve-wracked as Steve Martin in “Father of the Bride,” she stopped herself and apologized.  “Sorry.  I took a shot before I came out here.”

But it wasn’t all joking around.  Lawrence took the opportunity to talk about mental ailments, now that “Silver Linings Playbook” is helping to bring public attention and understanding to them.  “I don’t think we’re going to stop until we get rid of the stigma of mental illness. I know David won’t,” she said, referring to “Silver Linings Playbook” filmmaker David O. Russell, whose son has bipolar illness.  She pointed out that taking medicine for asthma and other ailments is something people take for granted, “but as soon as you take medicine for your mind, there’s such a stigma about it.” 

Lawrence’s backstage banter accounted for some of the more entertaining moments in an Oscar night that was uneven in the extreme, both on camera and off. 

The split personality of the evening – part traditional Oscar show, part frat boy joke fest – didn’t work.  It was like one of those zany Food Network fusion challenges, where chefs are asked to make a dish out of peppermint and chives or some such weird duo.  From the opening number on, host Seth MacFarlane ping-ponged between good and bad, the worst being his “joke” about John Wilkes Booth being the actor who really got into Lincoln’s head.  The feeling extended into the press area, too, where David Arquette had a seat as a Howard Stern Show plant (remember when Arquette had a career himself?) and disingenuous questions mingled with real ones.  Like beginning Best Actor winner, Daniel Day-Lewis’ interview with a question about how it was to wear that beard in “Lincoln,” was it uncomfortable?

Day-Lewis answered questions cordially.  (The beard was his own, of course.)  

Day-Lewis, who holds passports from both Ireland and the U.K., was asked within which style he’d celebrate.  “I’d be happy with either one.  I guess because I’m here, I’ll celebrate L.A. style.”  What a great finish to a role that began with the “paralyzing” prospect of getting Lincoln wrong and then never being able to show his face in America again – Day-Lewis making history as the only three-time Best Actor Oscar winner in history.

Anne Hathaway almost started to cry in the press room when she talked about her dream coming true – then was asked about the cynical responses she’s had for being open with her emotions.  Does that get to her?

“It does get to me,” she admitted.  “But you have to remember in life that there’s a positive to every negative and a negative to every positive…The universe is said to be 51 per cent matter and 49 per cent antimatter, so things tip in the scale of the possible.”  She added, “I live my life with love.  I live my life with compassion, hoping for the best for everyone, no matter how they feel about me.”

She also spoke of her “Les Miserables” leading man, Hugh Jackman, as uncynical.

“Tom Hooper, my director, has gone on record as saying without [Hugh] this film could not exist.  He has strength and soul, and artistry and fun.  We do live in a world that can tend toward the cynical. This film — it’s inherent to the film’s success that we believe in the goodness of this character.  Hugh has that.  People believed in him, and it made the film soar.”  Playing the unfortunate soul Fantine, she said, had made her “connect with the darkness of life; and more to the point, to the unnecessary suffering human beings inflict on each other all over the world.  It made me more aware.”

Hathaway glowed when asked about her husband, actor and jewelry designer Adam Shulman.  “He just made everything better and clearer and more real.  And that’s all I’m going to say.” 

At more than three and a half hours, this year’s Oscar show didn’t come close to producers Neil Meron’s and Craig Zadan’s pronouncement that they would “really try” to bring it in on time.  Nor did we see any evidence of their scientific-sounding scheme to take out wasted moments in order to have more time for entertainment.  What we did see was a lot of “Chicago” – a film from a decade ago that was showcased mainly because it was produced by Zadan and Meron.  And the “Dreamgirls” section of their 11-minute tribute to musicals showcased Jennifer Hudson, who has been appearing on “Smash,” which is produced by Zadan and Meron.  How long would the show have run without the Zadan and Meron material, one wonders.  Isn’t the idea to celebrate films of this year?

What a disappointment.

 

 

 

Ben Affleck and Fellow Nominees Are Winners at Oscar Nominees Luncheon

ben-affleck-argo-trailerBen Affleck is already an Oscar winner.

That’s right – no matter how his “Argo” fares at the 85th Academy Awards on Feb. 24, the canny filmmaking star has made the utmost of this awards season, helping to hoist his historical thriller to ever-greater prominence as it picks up honor after honor (Producers Guild, Directors Guild, Screen Actors Guild, Critics’ Choice Awards and Golden Globes) by bringing his self-effacing charisma and charm to every occasion.

His star power was certainly on display at this week’s Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon at the Beverly Hilton Hotel.  While some nominees eschewed the press room, Affleck took full advantage.  He entered to enthusiastic applause, then proceeded to turn question after question into a chance to promote his movie – and was so smooth and fun about it, nobody seemed to mind.  Commenting on the many interviews he’s done, he talked about how there’s “a whole spectrum of interesting stuff” in the “Argo” script — about a joint CIA-Canadian secret service operation to get a group of diplomats out of Iran by faking a movie production.  “I’ve worked on movies where I ran out of things to say at the junket in 15 seconds, so it’s incredibly satisfying to have something I enjoy continuing to talk about.”

Asked whether he thought there should be an expansion of the number of nominees in the Best Director category, to coincide with the Best Picture noms, he said, “I’ll leave those sorts of calculations to the folks in the press and the pundits and the Oscarologists or whatever it is.  I just feel incredibly honored to be here as producer of this movie, to be at the big party.  It’s tremendous.  Seven nominations, including Best Picture — I’m elated, truly genuinely thrilled.  So I don’t get into worrying too much about who was nominated for what,” added Affleck, referring to his snub in the directing category.  “I’ve had many, many, many, many, many – many — years watching from home.”

He talked glowingly of the Oscar-nominated directors, of the wave of talented movie makers in Mexico.  When a Univision reporter asked about “Argo’s” Mexican director of photography, Rodrigo Prieto, Affleck proudly told her he’d learned “nuevo palabras” from the cinematographer, including a word meaning “trusted friend” which he said Prieto called him all through the production.  The word caused snickering throughout the pressroom.  Suffice it to say, it does not mean trusted friend.

Always a festive occasion where all the nominees still feel like winners, this year’s luncheon was attended by more than 160 Oscar contenders – including youngest-ever nominee Quvenzhane Wallis (“Beasts of the Southern Wild”), adorable in a sparkly-top purple dress and poised beyond her nine years.

Also in purple hues was beautiful Jessica Chastain, who admitted, “It’s said that most little girls dream about their wedding dresses, but I always dreamed about my Oscar dress.”

The actress, whose portrayal of a driven CIA agent in “Zero Dark Thirty” landed her a Best Actress nomination, commented on women working in traditionally male-dominated arenas.  She offered the advice of “looking at the great examples of women like Kathyrn Bigelow and like Maya, the woman I play in this film.  Instead of complaining about the numbers not matching – and of course it’s a really important issue – but I’ve found, if you do really good work, it will rise to the top.  And Kathyn Bigelow never talks about the glass ceiling for women in Hollywood, for directors. She shows up on set.  She’s an expert at her work.  At the end of the day, that’s what she’s known for. You don’t think, ‘She’s a brilliant filmmaker – and she’s a woman, can you believe it?’  I just think, ‘She’s a brilliant filmmaker.’”

Jennifer Lawrence, stunning in a white strapless dress, talked fashion, too.  “Last time was comfort, this time it’s like, ‘Suck it up. Wear a corset’  I’m going to go for fashion.  It’s a shame the Oscars come at the end, when you’re exhausted from dressing up, and I never care.”

Best Supporting Actress Nominees-photo by Todd Wawrychuk / ©A.M.P.A.S.

Best Supporting Actress Nominees-photo by Todd Wawrychuk / ©A.M.P.A.S.

Anne Hathaway, looking tres chic with her pixie haircut and teeny tiny-waisted black dress, was asked whether she’d picked out a gown for the Academy Awards.  “I have to get on that don’t I?” she replied.  “It was the Super Bowl.  I couldn’t think about dresses with all that delicious fried food around.”

Naomi Watts also looked gorgeous in black

Speaking of great-looking, Best Actor nominee Bradley Cooper was asked whether “Silver Linings Playbook” was a game-changer for him.  “Well, I know that I wasn’t up here for ‘Hangover,’” he answered, to laughter.  “So maybe.”

Far from feeling worn out by the awards season whirl, Cooper said “I’m enjoying every minute of this — but it’s easy for me because I like people.  If I didn’t like people, if I had a hard time being around people, it would be difficult.”  He said that response to the touching film, in which he plays a man struggling with bipolar illness, has “gone so much farther than awards season,” with memorable events such as showing “Silver Linings Playbook” to troops in Washington, D.C.  “I’m very grateful.”

As far as his plans for the 24th, he said, “I’m sure the day of I’ll be calming my mother down.  She still doesn’t know what to wear.  So I think I’ll be a caretaker.”

 

Miley Cyrus Latest Disney Darling to Go From Virginal to Vixenish

Miley Cyrus at 2009 Teen Choice Awards

As Miley Cyrus contemplates her disappointing “Can’t Be Tamed” album sales and absorbs response to her latest stream of “Let Me Prove to You I’m a Grownup” antics – lap dancing with a director, vamping it up in tarty outfits on stage – we can’t help but compare her journey to those of so many Disney darlings before her.

What is it about crashing a sweet, virginal image to smithereens that makes it so inviting?

Of course, Britney Spears leaps to mind.  Miley has made it clear she’s a huge fan of  the 28-year-old superstar whose rollercoaster life has provided careers for tabloid writers and bloggers and paparazzi since 1999, when the former Mousketeer caused a stir with a Rolling Stone magazine cover in which she appeared lying on her bed clad in shorts, bra, and open top.  The American Family Association called for a boycott of stores selling her albums.  Shades of Miley’s Vanity Fair Lolita-esque photo brouhaha.

Christina Aguilera, Britney’s fellow former Mousketeer, traded in her girl-next-door wholesomeness for piercings, a neck tattoo, and a string of raunchy songs and videos.

Older audience members remember original Mousketeer Doreen Tracy, who posed for the men’s magazine Gallery wearing her Mousketeer ears and not much else, and who came out with a book, “Confessions of a Mouseketeer.”

Sadly, there is the train wreck that is once-promising Disney movie star Lindsay Lohan.

Somehow, “Princess Diaries” star Anne Hathaway managed to transition to adulthood in such a deft and sophisticated way, her audience accepted her doing nudity in movies and handling exceptionally gritty material – as in her Oscar-nominated turn in “Rachel Getting Married” – with little turmoil

Which is more than can be said for Hathaway’s onscreen grandma, the Queen of Genovia herself, the great Julie Andrews.  Globally adored after successes including “Mary Poppins” and “The Sound of Music,” she was delighted when her husband, Blake Edwards, put her in his 1981 satire “S.O.B.” as a goody-goody actress who makes a musical that flops and is then re-shot as a pornographic film.

Julie Andrews in "S.O.B."

“Mary Poppins Goes Topless” screamed headlines.  It created a furor at the time, but was eventually granted grudging acceptance.  Sure, she did it – but we’d rather watch the movies that have our Julie practically perfect in every way.

Hollywood Good Girls Who Go for Bad Boys — Why?

Anne Hathaway in "Get Smart"

By Stacy Jenel Smith

Anne Hathaway’s unfortunate taste in men was highlighted again last month, with news that the actress won’t be fighting the U.S. government’s plan to auction off the bling given to her by former boyfriend of four years, the now-imprisoned con man Rafaello Follieri. The baubles — including two Rolex watches, gold and silver rings, a Louis Vuitton jewelry box, a five-strand pearl necklace, a Tiffany clock and a Cartier figurine — will be on the block to help pay off the $2,440,000 judgment he has hanging over his head.

Also in May, her beau of the last several months, actor Adam Shulman, was accused of swiping a mural from a Manhattan construction sight. He subsequently gave back the street art and apologized, so all is well. We hope.

Even so, Hathaway fans are once again declaring that she deserves better, and wondering why someone as brilliant, accomplished and well-bred as she would get involved with unworthy men. Shulman is cute, but his biggest credits to date are his small role as a deputy sheriff in ‘The Dukes of Hazzard: the Beginning’ — and dating Anne Hathaway.

Fans wonder, just as they wonder about the also-classy Sandra Bullock and her soon-to-be ex-husband Jesse James. What drew someone smart and savvy enough to succeed as a Hollywood producer — on top of her Oscar-winning career as an actress — to such a cheating low-life?

What caused beautiful, beloved Jennifer Aniston to take back love ‘em and leave ‘em guy John Mayer in 2008, after he had already publicly humiliated her, telling TMZ he had ended their relationship because he just wanted to be alone and not ‘waste someone’s time.’ And that as far as cheating on her, well, those were ‘cheap lies,’ although seeing other people after a relationship has run its course is ‘the most normal thing in the world.’

In fact, for every generation of celebrities, there’ve been princess and bad boy stories.

Whitney Houston was an America’s Sweetheart when she hooked up with carousing, drug abusing bad boy Bobby Brown in 1989. Now, 21 years, a daughter, multiple rehab stints and a divorce later, she’s a wreck of her former self.

Doris Day, the ultimate Girl-Next-Door movie star of her time, had a weakness for men who were bad for her. Her turbulent 17-year union with svengali manager Marty Melcher was marked by his brutal treatment of her son, Terry. It was blamed for her emotional breakdown at one point, and for sieges of extreme ill health. And it was disastrous to her financially. She was presented with a $500,000 tax demand after his death, and was soon to find her fortune had been milked dry and she was broke save for personal possessions.

As Gwen Stefani asks in No Doubt’s ‘Bathwater,’ ‘Why do the good girls always want the bad boys?’

Hollywood shrinks issue answers. Talking about the Good Girl-Bad Boy conundrum in BettyConfidential.com, L.A.-based Dr. Morris Halperin declares, ‘It’s slightly egotistical behavior…It’s just like someone who wants an exotic animal as a pet. They actually think these guys will change their traits and be good to them….It’s out of touch with reality that they think, ‘I’m different. I can dance with this monster and control it.’ The reality is, you can’t have a tiger as a pet and control it.’

Obviously, that behavior certainly isn’t confined to women who are famous and successful. It’s hard-wired into society. Good Woman Reforms Bad Boy is a staple plotline we’ve seen play out in dozens of movies, going back to such chestnuts as John Wayne’s ‘Angel and the Bad Man,’ which was recently remade as a TV movie, through ‘Grease,’ ‘A Walk to Remember’ and the latest retellings of the classic fairy tale ‘Beauty and the Beast’ — the Disney animated film and this coming summer’s ‘Beastly’ with Vanessa Hudgens and Alex Pettyfer.

Another psychological explanation — that can also apply to the famed and the everyday female alike — was expressed to Ebony magazine by psychologist Carole Stovall: ‘A ‘good girl’ is a woman who has followed the rules all of her life; she’s been taught to go along with the status quo of what everyone else thinks she should do, be and want. These women have not had an opportunity to be who they are, so they are attracted to the men who rebel against the rules, and they live vicariously through them.’

That brings to mind those who point to Bullock’s strict upbringing as an explanation for her attraction to James and other bad boys, saying she was fulfilling an old desire to cut loose.

Poor male role models and relationship models in childhood are cited by other experts as a root of some women’s attraction to the ‘bad boy’ types — they go with what they know.

Low self-esteem is also a contributing factor in many of these relationships, on both sides, experts say.

Of course, psychologists can only speculate on the reasons that personalities they’re not treating may act as they do.

Jennifer Aniston’s declaration to Vogue — ‘Love just shows up’ — may be the closest thing to an explanation we’ll ever really have as to why she chose to hang with Mayer, who is now, happily, just part of her history.

Hank Azaria Happy New Dad, Talks ‘Love and Other Drugs’

Hank Azaria UPI Photo John Hayes

Hank Azaria UPI Photo John Hayes

Hank Azaria’s girlfriend Katie Wright and their four-month-old baby Hal just joined him on Pittsburgh location of “Love and Other Drugs” – which couldn’t please the actor and funnyman more. 

Although his son was born prematurely, “He’s fine — a big, 10-pound baby now.  He’s very calm, very easily soothed, very mellow so far.  It is fun to have the little guy around.  He’s just starting to recognize us,” reports Azaria. 

Asked about what kind of role he’d most like to play next, the besotted new dad answers, “To be honest, I’m pretty happy to hang around and just stare at the baby for awhile.” 

MEANWHILE:  Right now, Azaria’s attention is also on “Love and Other Drugs.”  In fact, he tells us that with the health care debate raging on, he and Anne Hathaway, Jake Gyllenhaal and the rest of the “Love and Other Drugs” team keep saying to each other, “We wish this movie was coming out next week.  It just has so much to say about the effect big pharma has really had on the medical profession and the health care world.  It’s greater than people think,” Hank declares.  “This really goes into what that system has created and how it works in a day-to-day way.”

As it is, the comedic drama/romance has weeks of production left to go.  Azaria is playing “a doctor of questionable ethics, who engages in some things dealing with pharmaceutical companies that you wish your doctor wouldn’t do” in the feature.  Drawn from “Hard Sell: The Evolution of a Viagra Salesman” by Jamie Reidy, the film’s depiction of “this whole world – the pharmaceutical world – and the Viagra story itself are all true.  The love story between Jake and Anne, that part is fiction,” he says. 

Meanwhile, the four-time Emmy winner has been recording his “The Simpsons” parts long distance as on the “Drugs” shoot goes.  The landmark animated comedy is soon to hit its 20 year milestone, and he’s looking forward to celebrating that.  “I’m sure they’ll be doing some kind of party or something with a lot of balloons.”

MAN ON THE MOVE:  Dividing his time between making and promoting the “Twilight” sequel, “New Moon,” and threequel, “Eclipse,” and his work as Dr. Fitch “Coop” Cooper on “Nurse Jackie” has put, well, nearly inhuman demands on Peter Facinelli, a.k.a. head vampire Carlyle Cullen, over the past several months. 

“Sometimes I’ve gone without sleep for like 36 hours.  It’s tedious, but we worked it all out and it’s been doable, with some flying back and forth,” says Facinelli.  “It’s exciting. I mean, I love to do what I do. I love to work.  Sometimes it’s nice to have a break in-between, yes, but you do what you need to do.”

He did two weeks of rehearsal and a week of fight training for “Eclipse,” then went into filming the movie with plans to dive directly into new season shooting on “Nurse Jackie.”  As far as his schedule, “It was great. Both sides kind of worked it out before the boards were done on both shows.  The trick is to go in early to talk about your schedule, before the boards are done.  So it’s give and take,” he says.

 Fight training came pretty easily to him.  “I’m pretty athletic.  I did that show ‘Fast Lane’ for awhile and I did 90 per cent of my own stunts, just because I like doing them.  If I don’t go home bruised, I don’t feel like I put in a good day’s work.”

The actor, also known as Jennie Garth’s hubby, certainly couldn’t be playing characters who are much farther apart.  “Someone sent me a picture of Carlyle Cullen next to a picture of Coop and they were so vastly different it made me laugh.  Sometimes I look at pictures of Carlyle and say ‘I don’t look anything like that.’  I’ve always tried to do different things.  When people ask me what I want to do next, I always say ‘Anything I haven’t done before.’”

NOT FOR KIDS:  The no-holds-barred conversation Denise Richards had with Howard Stern on his radio show last June – in which she discussed her boob jobs, types of sex she enjoyed, and ex Charlie Sheen – was so scintillating to Stern fans that the actress-reality star-Playboy pictorial subject has been dubbed a top guest of all time.  “I was very surprised by the response,” she tells us, making it clear she has no regrets.  “I would definitely do Howard Stern’s show again. You have to know what you’re getting into, and I did.  That’s why I’d never done his show before.  My publicist was saying, ‘I don’t think there’s anything you haven’t been asked at this point,’ so I decided to do it and have fun with it, and I was very honest with him,” she recounts.  “Obviously, as soon as I got done, I called my dad back in L.A. and said, ‘Do not listen to Howard Stern,’ and, you know, if you see any quotes on the internet, don’t read them.”  Obviously.

THE BIGGEST SOFTIE:  Hard-driving though “The Biggest Loser” trainer Bob Harper may be, he’s also known to hold a competitor’s hand and have a cry in an emotional moment.  He bonds with his followers and has “established lasting friendships.  I’m a touchstone for them.  If they need me for anything, they reach out.  With all the social networking possibilities these days, I definitely hear from them – ‘Bob, I’ve hit a plateau.’  You have to trust the process to stay on course.”

With reports by Emily-Fortune Feimster