Tag Archives: Sharon Osbourne

Enough With the Celebrity Splits, Here’s a Valentine’s Day Look at Love Among the Stars

Jay-Z and Beyonce WENN.com photo

Recent months have been hell for stories of celebrity splits, from Heidi and Seal to Katy and Russell, Demi and Ashton to Johnny and Vanessa and more.  But today being Valentine’s Day, let us take a moment to shine some light on love in the celebrity leagues — where the gestures are grander, the gifts are more lavish, and imaginations can soar unfettered by bank balance considerations.

 Jennifer Aniston’s vast legions of fans, who’ve suffered with America’s Sweetheart through the Brad Pitt split and painful John Mayer period, can take heart in her declaration that she is now in a “joyful and peaceful place” with Justin Theroux.  If our Jen can find a good man at last, darn it, then there’s hope for all the lovelorn.  Last year, she gifted her hunky beau with a $12,000 jacket that had been worn by James Dean.

Who doesn’t feel heart-warmed by new Mom & Dad Beyonce and Jay-Z, whose investments in expressions of love perhaps outstrip the GNP of a small country by now.  A few examples:  When Beyonce turned 23, Jay-Z blew a half million dollars on a huge hip hop party, complete with live mermaids (okay, they weren’t really mermaids, but not because he couldn’t afford real mermaids!) and an ice sculpture that read “Beautiful B.”  For her 25th, he not only gave his lady a big party in New York, the hip hop mogul reportedly spent $1 million to buy her a 1959 Rolls Royce convertible.  In 2010, she bought him a Bugatti Grand Sport, for a reported $2 million.  His new gigantic sapphire pinky ring, worth an estimated $500,000, is believed to be Beyonce’s gift of thanks to Jay-Z for being such a good daddy to baby Blue Ivy, who is four weeks and three days old today (2/14).  In a related story, Blue Ivy is said to already have more than $1.5 million worth of toys, in addition to her trademarked name and hit record release.  (Jay-Z’s “Glory” included her first sounds, making Blue Ivy the youngest artist ever on the Billboard charts.)

Romantic might not be the first word that leaps to mind when you think of fried-sounding heavy metal icon Ozzy Osbourne and his potty-mouthed rock matriarch cum talk and reality show queen, Sharon.  But the couple has been wed 30 years this year. They’ve made it through drug and illness nightmares that could have rendered asunder a less devoted pair.  That’s plenty romantic enough.  And how about this?  Ozzy buys pearls for Sharon on Valentine’s Day every year.  She tells the story of how he was performing in Japan the first year they were a couple, and he went into a shop and bought her a strand of pearls there – despite the fact they had no money at the time.  The bill arrived three weeks later, as she related in a U.K. Rate the Music interview, and “I’m like, ‘Oh Ozzy, we’re going to have to work for like six months to pay off this bill!’   So, it’s now become a tradition — pearls.”

Speaking of odd, Shirley Jones and Marty Ingels still strike folks as the unlikeliest of couples – the loud and often grating comic and the genteel Oscar-winning actress and musical star.  They weren’t supposed to last but it’s been 35 years this year since they became husband and wife, and they say they’re a testimony to the power of laughter.  Ingels also knows the power of a spectacular gesture – having pulled such shenanigans as having a mariachi band performing out on their lawn for one of their anniversaries.  He also once purchased an entire candy store in Beverly Hills as a gift for “Shirl,” who happened to like a particular type of candy sold there.  Sweet!

Of course, it doesn’t always have to be about money.   “Criminal Minds” star Joe Mantegna told us his favorite romantic moment “was in 1975.  My love Arlene and I were touring with a play in Europe.  We were like hippies, without much money in our pockets.  We went up to the top of the Eiffel Tower on October 3 and did a kind of personal marriage thing.  We had to go back to Chicago to make it legal, but it’s that October 3 date we celebrate, that we consider our anniversary date.  Even more romantic was a date that came 25 years later — on October 3.  We were with our two daughters and went to the top of the Eiffel Tower and recited our vows again.  What made it more special was that our daughter Mia, who was about 14 at the time, was wearing the same blue jean jacket Arlene had worn that first time.”

And  then there’s Julie Benz of “Dexter” and Charlie Sheen’s upcoming “Anger Management” series.  She recalls, “In fifth grade, Peter Esselman wrote me a letter that said he would love me even if all my hair fell out and I regurgitated all over myself.  And he drew a picture of me with no hair, regurgitating on myself.   That’s love.”

With Plethora of Imported TV Stars, It’s Time for Talent Tariff

Alex O'Loughlin

What do Hollywood casting directors have against American actors?  Oh, sure, we’ve been seeing this explosion of Brits, Aussies, Kiwis, Irish folk and other English-speaking foreigners on U.S. primetime for several years now, but there hasn’t been any complaining out of fear the U.K would want to take back Hugh Laurie, and goodness knows nobody wanted that.

However, things have gone too far.  Now we have an Australian (Alex O’Loughlin) playing Steve McGarrett on CBS’s new “Hawaii Five-O,” for crying out loud.  Plus, there’s this 13 trillion-dollar national debt thing that makes even ludicrous revenue-generating ideas sound good.  So the time has come for Uncle Sam to make some money off this imported TV star phenomenon.  The time has come for a Talent tariff.

Piers Morgan

Think of the increasingly annoying Piers Morgan, for instance.  The arrogant Fleet Street tabloid editor — whose claims to fame include being fired in the wake of the revelation that Daily Mirror photos purportedly showing British troops mistreating Iraqi prisoners were faked.   Brighton-born Simon Cowell ordained Guildford-born Piers as his substitute (a.k.a. “the mean one”), when Simon himself was contractually prevented (“American Idol”) from being an “America’s Got Talent” judge — and America went along.    This proves America’s weakness toward believing anyone with a British accent is qualified for their job.   Now Morgan is the man who would be King, as in Larry King, as in being named as the new host of King’s 25-year-old CNN show.

This is not right.  If we have to take Piers Morgan, we should be making money on it — or at least, the British should have to take Perez Hilton in exchange.

Speaking of “America’s Got Talent,” there’s oh-so-much more to love about Piers’ London-born cohort Sharon Osbourne than him.  And yet, Ozzy’s purple-red-haired frau is nearing massive over-exposure with yet another gig, CBS’s yet-untitled daytime show for fall.  But let us not be irritated.  Let us be enriched.  Talent tariff, people!

There’s Australia’s Simon Baker, England’s Natascha McElhone and Ed Westwick, Scotland’s Kevin McKidd.  The list goes on and on.  Money, money, money.

And let’s not forget the growing South Asian/Indian contingent.  As “The Big Bang Theory’s” Kunal Nayyar declared to press at last week’s TCA panel in reference to himself, most of the cast of NBC’s new “Outsourced” and various other shows, “We are everywhere now…It doesn’t surprise me.  We are all really good-looking and talented, and I’m really happy that we continue to take over the world.”

Can you say, “Ka-ching”?!

Jon Voight Blasts Letterman, Mulls Next Move

Jon Voight

Jon Voight

Count Jon Voight among the many who are appalled by David Letterman’s tacky sex jokes last week about former Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin’s daughter.  “It’s disgusting…the lowest kind of behavior,” says Voight of the lines (including, “One awkward moment for Sarah Palin at the Yankee game — during the seventh inning stretch, her daughter was knocked up by Alex Rodriguez.”)

“David Letterman is an icon.  I thought he had a little higher ethical understanding, but he’s right there in the mud,” blasts Jon.

Letterman vs. Palin is just one of the matters that has the Oscar-winning actor feeling outrage these days – as those who heard or read his attack on President Obama as a “false prophet” at a Republican fund-raiser last week are aware.  He admits he’s had complaint calls about his statements.

However, he says, “I’ve received many more calls saying thank-you.  I feel we all have to wake up.  It’s no time to be thinking in a selfish vein.  Look, no one is firing weapons at me like our guys in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq have to contend with.  If I lose a job or two, it’s not like the millions of people losing jobs in this economy.”

Voight has thus far continued to stay busy before the cameras – in last season’s “24” for instance — despite his vociferously expressed views that run counter to the majority in Hollywood.  In fact, he blames Hollywood for “the vilification of George Bush that had so much to do with Obama’s success.”   Now, he figures, opponents will be trying “to paint me as a nut or find other ways to deflect me.”

Is he thinking of going into politics full-time?

“I’m still an actor and going to do my work as an actor, but I’m not going to be silent and I don’t want anybody else to be silent.  People are holding to a very extreme left wing agenda and putting their money into it.  The spending that’s going on — there’s almost no word for it.  We’re putting our grandchildren into a great burden of debt, and people are allowing [this administration] to make all their decisions for them.  These are very, very serious times for all Americans.”

Right now, “I don’ t know exactly what I’m going to do next,” he says.  “I’m taking a couple of days now to see.  I’m going to get some rest and exercise.  I have to make some decisions about work and stuff like that.”

MEANWHILE:  Between hurling and dodging brickbats, Voight is taking satisfaction in the fact that his “Lookin’ to Get Out” comedy of 1982 (which he co-wrote) is about to about to be re-released on DVD June 20 – in director Hal Ashby’s cut for the first time.  “This film was never seen the way it was supposed to be seen.  It was a crippled version of what it was supposed to be,” Voight says.  Referring to the filmmaker whose credits include such memorable fare as “Harold and Maude” “Being There” and “Bound For Glory,” he says, “Hal never had a chance to do this film his way.  He was working on three films at the same time back then, he had a lot of distractions.”  And when the studio insisted on 15 minutes of cuts at the last minute, “He walked away.”

Voight, who won his Oscar for Ashby’s “Coming Home,” found out decades after Ashby’s death in ’88 that he had completed his own cut of the film and given it to the UCLA archive.  It’s that version coming out this month.

THE VIDEOLAND VIEW: Just because “a third of the country wouldn’t air it” and “Fox doesn’t want to be associated with what we want to represent” don’t count out “Osbournes: Reloaded.” That’s the word from Sharon Osbourne, who points out that even though banned far and wide for what some stations termed “inappropriate content and profanity,” the variety show “still got 10,200,000 viewers.  I would be worried if it hadn’t drawn so many people.  We’ve still got five great shows in the can… What one channel doesn’t want, another does,” she says.  So, where might “Osbournes: Reloaded” land?  Comedy Central?  “You’re very clever because that’s where we ant to go,” she says.   As they say, stay tuned.

CASTING CORNER: Casting forces for filmmaker Ed Zwick have been talking to candidates to play the father of Jake Gyllenhaal in Zwick’s “Love and Other Drugs” film also starring Anne Hathaway.  The ideal actor should be between 55 and 60 years old and it couldn’t hurt if he has gorgeous blue-green eyes with long lashes like Jake’s.  But anyway, the character is a doctor who disapproves of his son’s career as a pharmaceutical sales guy.  Also being cast for the flick, which rolls in September, are his younger bother and mom.

With reports by Emily-Fortune Feimster